STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
MSW Program
SWK 525
Advanced Generalist Practice
R. Bruce McNellie, Ph.D.,LCSW,DCSW,LPC,LMFT

mcnellie@mcnellie.com
(936)560-9437; 936 371 2910


This a reference page for those taking SWK 525. It may change slightly from year to year with varying syllabi, but the reference material should remain the same. Feel free to email me with any suggestions.



Syllabus in MS-Word Document

http://www.mcnellie.com/525

Prerequisites: Completion of Professional Foundation or Advanced Standing
Corequisite: SWK 510, SWK 517


Some of you asked for the details of the casebook that accompanies the DSM-IV. The one I was discussing (there are several versions of this book) is:

Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., Skodol, A. E., Williams, J. B. W., & First, M. B. (Eds.) (1994). DSM-IV Casebook: a learning compainion ot the diagnositic and statistical manula of mental disorders, fourth edition. Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute.  American Psychological Press, Inc. Washington, D. C.
I found it at: http://www.amazon.com/Dsm-IV-Casebook-Companion-Diagnostic-Statistical/dp/0880486759/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1221941556&sr=8-4



 
Resources:
(index.doc)

Theories and supplimental readings:
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/adlerreview.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/antidepressants.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/depression.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/dysthymia.rtf

http:www.mcnellie.com/525/keyterms.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/lcswpresent.ppt
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/mooddisorders.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/piaget.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/prisoners.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/psychotherapy.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/realitytherapy.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/sadpersons.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/sexidentities.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/shame.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/stressedmoms.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/theories.rtf
http:www.mcnellie.com/525/transactionaloverview.rtf

Child Development: 0 - 60 months

http://www.mcnellie.com/develop/checklist.xls

http://www.mcnellie.com/develop/manual.doc

http://www.mcnellie.com/develop/checklist.doc

www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/

APA tool:
Pagination.doc


Sample Tests:

Test 1,   Test 1 answers

Test 2, Test 2 answers 

Test 3   Test 3 answers


Group and Community:

Groupcommunity.ppt

Supervision:

Supervisionreview.doc
Supervision.ppt
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/Supervisionreview.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/supervisionshortcourse.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/supervision.ppt

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/character.doc

Children Services:

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/childwelfarenotes.doc


Therapies:

Bowenpresent.doc
Bowen.doc

TheoriesChart.doc
familytherapyreview.doc
conjointpresntation.doc
bowenpresent.doc
bowen.doc
adler.rtf
Behaviortherapy.ppt
Familytherapy.ppt
Miltonerickson.ppt
Behaviortherapy.ppt

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/hypnoticscripts.doc


Family Therapy:
familytherapyreview.doc

Statistics:
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/standarddeviation.doc


Diagnostic Assessment:

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/diagnosticassessment.rtf

Dream Interpretation:
dreaminterpretation.doc
dreamsaremadeof.doc
dreamsymbols.doc
dreamtopten.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/dreamsymbols.doc
For fun, a brain exercise: brain.exe

Supervision in Social Services in a Rural Context
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/supervisionshortcourse.doc

Human Behavior:

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/flirt.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/character.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/personality.rtf
Therapies.doc NonverbalCues.ppt BodyLanguage.doc


Handouts:
trust.doc

flirting.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/flirt.doc

hair.doc



Theories:
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/counselingtheorylazarusglasser.rtf

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/Theories.html


Ethics Model:

EthicsModel.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/4/EthicsModel.doc
Ethics Codes.doc

Erikson's developmental chart
http://mcnellie.com/erikson.html
Eriksondevelopmentassessment.doc    Graph
Profilechart
Total Scale Scores

Conjoint Exercise:
Conjoint Exercise

Imago Exercise:
Imagoinstructions.doc
Imagoexercise.doc

Values in rural populations:
RuralValues.ppt

Sample LMSW Exam

Syllabus in MS-Word Document


 
Tentative Class Schedule with Readings:

Week 15: Final exam
/ SFASU Scheduled final.
Week 14 (A) Interventions: Narrative and Object relations

Readings: (1) K&H 11-12
   

General review of advanced generalist practice with individuals and families in rural settings.  Discussion of social workers in others areas of practice within rural communities.

Solution focused interventions with Families
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/solutionfocus.ppt

Review for Final

miltonerickson.ppt
hypnoticscripts.doc

Pagination.doc

Week 13    Paper #2 due   
(A)
Situations for Brief Therapy; (B) Interventions: Solution-focused & family systems intervention     

Readings

(1)  K&H 9-10

(2)  Mander

The final paper must be emailed to mcnellie@mcnellie.com by 5:00 pm, CST class day on week 13, 2008. No papers will be accepted past December 3, 2008.

http://www.mcnellie.com/525/Groupcommunity.ppt
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/notesweek13.doc

Week 12   
(A) Evaluating families;
(B) Interventions: Structural & social learning  

Readings

(1)  K&H 7-8

(2)  Deacon & Piercy


Week 11  
(A) Strengths-based family care;
(B)                Family preservation, case management 

Readings

(1)  K&H 5-6

(2)  Smith & Hall


Supervision in Social Services in a Rural Context Continued
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/supervisionshortcourse.doc

  
Child Welfare in a Rural Context Continued
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/childwelfarenotes.doc
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/childabuse102808txt.ppt
The following file is very large 24 meg + and may take a long time to load. It is the previous powerpoint presentation with pictures.
http://www.mcnellie.com/525/childabuse102808.ppt



Week 10    (A)  Assessment and planning; (B)              Family Diversity, Family spirituality and values 

Readings

(1)  K&H 3-4

(2)  Heydt & Sherman

Childhood Trauma and Child Welfare

   Substitute Care - : Advanced generalist practice with individuals, families and groups in rural protective services and mental health.

Week 9   (A)  Engaging families;
  (B) Levels of Family Need, Ecological Systems

Readings   

(1)  K&H 1-2

(2)  Marts, Eun-Kyoung, McRoy, & McCroskey




Week 8    Midterm Exam 

      (B)  Introduction to Family system; Defining family

Readings

(1)  Marsh

Working in rural settings:  ethical implications


Week 7        REVIEW FOR MID-TERM
                
   Paper #1 due. 

(A)                  Terminating and followup      

             

Readings

(1)  Mattison, Jayaratne,  Srinika, & Croxton

   Working in rural settings:  ethical implications

Week 6/7

week7.doc

week6.doc

midtermnotesfortest.doc

See nonverbal cues link below



Week 6   (A)  Evaluating progress 

    (B)  Advanced evaluative evidence and tools, Recordkeeping and reporting  

Readings

(1) Reid

                (2) Bigler.


Week 5   (A)  Specialized interventions with individuals 

    (B)  Identifying and utilizing client strengths, Theory selection for individuals   

Readings

(1)  McMahon, p. 80-105

(2)  De Jong & Miller

  
 

Notes from week 4    (A)   Differential assessment tools and strategies     

      (B)  Advanced Generalist skills,     

Readings

(1)  McMahon, p.107-127

(2)  Douglas

(3)  Rosen & Livne 


 

Notes from Week 3 (A)  Problem-solving method, Engagement, Advanced data collection   

(B)                         Rural oppression and poverty, Self-determination and informed consent,

         the tension of empathy and boundaries  

Readings

(1)  Cohen

(2)  Green, Gregory, & Mason

(3)  Taylor   (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/29/44/ )

  


Notes from Week 2   (A)  From Generalist to Advanced Generalist with individuals   

    (B)  Therapeutic relationships in the rural context, Managing dual relationships   

Readings 

(1)  McNellie

(2)  Johner    (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/30/44/  )

(3)  Gottlieb    (http://kspope.com/dual/gottlieb.php#copy)                         

(4)  Younggren    (http://kspope.com/dual/younggren.php)




Sample Tests:
Test 1, Test 1 answers

 
Week 1: Introduction to Advanced Generalist Practice in a Rural Context

(A)  Personal Introductions. Review syllabus. Overview of class goals.   

(B) Ethical dilemmas and case studies, the changing rural environment and people

Readings

None    




STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

MSW PROGRAM

 

SWK 525        Advanced Generalist Practice          

R. Bruce McNellie, Ph.D.,MSSW,LCSW,DCSW,LPC,LMFT http://www.mcnellie.com/525

Prerequisites: Completion of Professional Foundation or Advanced Standing

Corequisite: SWK 510, SWK 517  mcnellie@mcnellie.com  rmcnellie@sfasu.edu

(936)560-9437

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

I.          Course Purpose

 

Advanced Practice I is required during the first semester of the concentration.  It builds on all courses taken during the foundation and focuses on obtaining depth and breadth of knowledge across complex problem areas, populations at risk and practice settings within a rural context.  Greater skill and autonomy in a wider selection of problem solving, assessment, intervention and evaluation strategies with individuals and families is learned.  Greater depth in awareness, sensitivity and professional response to issues of ethics, values, diversity, social and economic justice and populations at risk is achieved.

 

Linking with Advanced Practice II, focusing on organizations and communities that is taught concurrently, students gain integration and mastery across advanced generalist levels of practice.  Horizontal integration also occurs with concurrent advanced policy and research courses.  The combination and integration of these advanced generalists concentration courses with the foundation prepares students for the following block placement.

 

TEXTS:

Required Text:

 

Kilpatrick, A. C. & Holland, T. P. (2006). Working with Families: An Integrative Model by Level of Need,  (4th  ed.) Boston: Pearson.

 

II.        CURRICULUM DESCRIPTION

 

The MSW program of SFASU features a generalist foundation and a single concentration:  Advanced Generalist Practice in a Rural Context, both defined below.

 

It is important to note here that the BSW program and the MSW program have developed a shared definition of generalist practice, given below.

 

Generalist practice is a practice perspective that serves diverse client systems utilizing an ecological systems approach focusing on persons, families, groups, organizations and communities within the context of the rural social environment.  It is not confined by a narrow cadre of theories; rather; it is versatile enough to allow problems and situations as well as strengths, capacities and resources to determine the practice approach.  Generalist practice employs a problem solving framework and a broad knowledge, value and skill base which demands ethical practice and on-going self-assessment.  Briefly, generalist social work practice:

 

(This is a shared definition by both the BSW and MSW programs.)

 

Advanced Generalist Practice builds on the generalist foundation, incorporating the elements listed above, but characterized by a greater depth, breadth, and autonomy as demonstrated through specialized knowledge across problem areas, populations-at-risk and practice settings, with a greater selection of diverse interactions across practice levels.

 

Briefly advanced generalist practice requires:

 

The concentration for the MSW program is advanced generalist practice for rural contexts.

 

Rural practice is social work both in and with rural communities, and it is also social work with rural people.  Rural communities in a limited geographic sense are non-metropolitan, in that they have populations of less than 50,000 and are not adjacent to a metropolitan area.  Social work with rural people is characterized by social exchange between people and systems that is less formal and more personal than that of urban environments.  Social exchange theory and Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft are appropriate theoretical basis for understanding these exchanges.

 

Social problems such as high poverty rates, inadequate housing, inadequate health care, scarcity of resources and professional, socio-economic underdevelopment, and physical distance from services and transportation are frequently identified as important problems and issues for rural communities.  Development of resources, use of natural helping networks, and community development are often proposes as appropriate interventions in these communities.  Important opportunities and strengths such as “sense of community”, intimacy among community residents, orientations toward self-sufficiency, and an abundance of personal space, often go unnoticed by outsiders.

 

III.       COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

 

1.         Define advanced generalist social work practice within a rural context.

 

2.         Demonstrate an understanding of the underlying theories in social work practice, as they             pertain to individuals and families in rural settings.

 

3.                  Demonstrate understanding of social work values and ethics in advanced practice with individuals and families in the rural context.

 

4.                  Apply knowledge of human behavior in the selection of differential assessments and application of advanced problem solving strategies in complex situations in rural settings.

 

5.                  Demonstrate knowledge of specialized interventions with individuals and families, and their applications in social work practice with rural populations.

 

6.                  Demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of empirical research in informing rural social work practice strategies.

 

7.                  Demonstrate knowledge of differential evaluation strategies utilized in advanced social work interventions with individuals and families in rural settings.

 

8.                  Demonstrate an understanding of the need for cultural competence necessary to promote social and economic justice in social work practice situations in rural settings.

 

9.         Demonstrate the ability to understand, utilize, develop, manage and coordinate human    service networks and organizations in order to improve service delivery to rural clients            and to advocate for non-discriminatory social and economic systems.

 

IV.       INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS

This course will be taught in lecture/discussion style with use of videos and experiential exercises as appropriate.  In order to be successful in class, it is important that students attend regularly, read the assigned material, and come to class prepared to discuss what they have read. Lectures will not duplicate the reading material except to clarify or expand upon it.  Students are expected to be active learners and to ask for clarification when they have questions.

 

V.        COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1    (A)  Personal Introductions. Review syllabus. Overview of class goals.        

(B) Ethical dilemmas and case studies, the changing rural environment and people

Readings

None   

Week 2   (A)  From Generalist to Advanced Generalist with individuals           

    (B)  Therapeutic relationships in the rural context, Managing dual relationships           

Readings 

(1)  McNellie

(2)  Johner    (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/30/44/  )

(3)  Gottlieb    (http://kspope.com/dual/gottlieb.php#copy)                         

(4)  Younggren    (http://kspope.com/dual/younggren.php)

Week 3 (A)  Problem-solving method, Engagement, Advanced data collection 

(B)   Rural oppression and poverty, Self-determination and informed consent,

         the tension of empathy and boundaries           

Readings

(1)  Cohen

(2)  Green, Gregory, & Mason

(3)  Taylor   (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/29/44/ )

 

 

Week 4    (A)   Differential assessment tools and strategies      

      (B)  Advanced Generalist skills,     

Readings

(1)  McMahon, p.107-127

(2)  Douglas

(3)  Rosen & Livne 

Week 5   (A)  Specialized interventions with individuals           

    (B)  Identifying and utilizing client strengths, Theory selection for individuals   

Readings

(1)  McMahon, p. 80-105

(2)  De Jong & Miller

Week 6   (A)  Evaluating progress       

    (B)  Advanced evaluative evidence and tools, Recordkeeping and reporting  

Readings

(1) Reid

(2) Bigler.

Week 7     Paper #1 due. 

(A)     Terminating and followup                    

(B)      

Readings

(1)  Mattison, Jayaratne,  Srinika, & Croxton

Week 8    Midterm Exam        

      (B)  Introduction to Family system; Defining family

Readings

(1)  Marsh

Week 9   (A)  Engaging families   

    (B) Levels of Family Need, Ecological Systems

Readings   

(1)  K&H 1-2

(2)  Marts, Eun-Kyoung, McRoy, & McCroskey

Week 10    (A)  Assessment and planning       

(B)    Family Diversity, Family spirituality and values           

Readings

(1)  K&H 3-4

(2)  Heydt & Sherman

Week 11   (A)  Strengths-based family care    

(B)    Family preservation, case management           

Readings

(1)  K&H 5-6

(2)  Smith & Hall

Week 12    (A)  Evaluating families      

(B)    Interventions: Structural & social learning       

Readings

(1)  K&H 7-8

(2)  Deacon & Piercy

Week 13    Paper #2 due   

(A)    Situations for Brief Therapy 

(B)     Interventions: Solution-focused & family systems intervention

Readings

(1)  K&H 9-10

(2)  Mander

Week 14     (A)  Interventions:  Narrative & object relations    

Readings

(1)  K&H 11-12

Week 15    Final Exam

VI.       COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students are expected to attend all class sessions.  Because this class serves as a laboratory for learning/practicing skills and techniques, class participation is an important part of the student’s learning experience. Absences and/or a persistent pattern of lateness will affect a student’s grade.  See attached descriptions of assignments. In all written assignments, students are expected to use APA style.  Plagiarism will not be tolerated and assignment will be given an automatic F.

Assignment 1  (Individuals)                               100 points

Assignment 2  (Families)                                   100 points

Midterm Exam                                                 100 points

Final Exam                                                       100 points

 

Total                                                                400 points

 

VII.     EVALUATION AND GRADING

Grading Scale:

 270-300          A

 240-269          B

 210-239          C

 180-209          D*

Below 180       F*

*Not applicable as credit toward graduate degree

Intellectual Integrity and Plagiarism

“Throughout their educational program, students should be impressed with the fact that cheating and plagiarism are morally degrading and that these practices seriously interfere with learning and intellectual development.”

“Plagiarism:  Courtesy and honesty require that any ideas or material borrowed from another must be fully acknowledged.  Offering the work of another as one’s own is plagiarism.  The subject matter of the ideas thus taken from another may range from a few sentences or paragraphs to entire articles copied from books, periodicals, or the writing of other students.  The offering of materials assembled or collected by others in the form of projects or collections without acknowledgements is also considered plagiarism.  Any student who fails to give credit for ideas or materials taken from another is guilty of plagiarism.”  SFASU Student Handbook

Honesty and representing one’s knowledge and abilities appropriately are important ethical principles of the social work profession.  Any student found to have plagiarized or to have cheated on an assignment will be given a 0 on that assignment.  Given the limited number of graded assignments in this course, a 0 could have serious consequences for the student’s academic standing.

Appropriate attribution is expected on all works that have been used in any assignment. This includes any published or unpublished works by anyone and any personal work that has been turned in for any assignment or has been published. Papers that have been previously turned in for course credit are to receive appropriate attribution as either a published or unpublished work.

 

General Policies for the Course

Students are expected to arrive on time and stay for the duration of the class. Class participation is expected.

The Office of Disability Services is committed to providing equal opportunities in higher education to academically qualified students with disabilities who demonstrate a reasonable expectation of college success. Disabled students attending this university will be integrated as completely as possible into the University community. The university shares responsibility with the student for modifying campus facilities and programs to meet individual need. Students with disabilities at Stephen F. Austin State University can have access to tools and resources that will assist them. For more information about access to tools and resources, students may direct questions to: Disability Services, Stephen F. Austin State University, P.O. Box 6130, Nacogdoches, Texas 75962-6130 or call (936)468-3004 or go to www.sfasu.edu/disabilityservices/index.htm.

 

Assignments must be submitted on the due date. Late work receives a grade of 0 (unless previous arrangements have been made with the instructor). The only exceptions to this policy are University excused absences. These exceptions are the illness of self or a near family member and death of a near family member.  The instructor should be notified in these cases prior to the beginning of the class period.

 

All assignments must be submitted in electronic form for grading. The preferred format is Microsoft Word. If another format is used, such as WordPerfect, Rich Text Format (rtf), or other word processing software, it must be compatible with MS Word. Papers should be submitted to:

 

 

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY

School of Social Work

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Advanced Generalist Practice

SWK 525

    
Bigler, M. O.  (2005) Harm reduction as a practice and prevention model for social work. The Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work, 10(2),  69-86.

Cohen, M. B.  (1989).  Social work practice with homeless mentally ill people: engaging the client. Social Work, 34(6), 505-509.

Cox, K.  (2008).  Tools for building on youth strengths.  Reclaiming Children and Youth, 16(4), 19-22.

Deacon, S. A. & Piercy, F. P.  (2001).  Qualitative methods in family evaluation: creative assessment techniques.  American Journal of Family Therapy, 29(5), 355-373.

Douglas, H.  (2008).  Preparation for contact: an aid to effective social work intervention.  Social Work Education, 27(4), 380-389.

Gottlieb, M.  (1993).  Avoiding exploitive dual relationships:  a decision-making model.  Psychotherapy, 30(1), 41-48.  (http://kspope.com/dual/gottlieb.php#copy)

Graziano, M.  (2008).  Tapping into strengths.  Psychotherapy Networker Magazine, 32(3), 21-22.

Green, R., Gregory, R., & Mason, R.  (2006).  Professional distance and social work: stretching the elastic?  Australian Social Work, 59(4), 449-461.

Heydt, M. J. & Sherman, N. E.  (2005).  Conscious use of self: tuning the instrument of social work practice with cultural competence.  Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work, 10(2), 25-40.

Johner, R.  (2006)  Dual relationship legitimization and client self-determination.  Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics, 3(1).   (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/30/44/)

Mander, G.  (2005).  Suitability and context for brief therapy.  Psychodynamic Practice, 11(4), 417-428.

Marsh, J. C.  (2002).   Learning from clients.  Social Work, 47(4), 341-343.

Marts, E. J., Eun-Kyoung, O. L., McRoy, R., & McCroskey, J.  (2008).  Point of engagement: reducing disproportionality and improving child and family outcomes.  Child Welfare, 87(2), 335-358.

Mattison, D., Jayaratne, S., & Croxton, T.  (2002).  Client or former client? Implications of ex-client definition on social work practice.  Social Work,  47(1), 55-64.

McMahon, M. (1994).  Knowledge for advanced generalist practice. In Advanced generalist practice with an international perspective. (pp. 80-106).  Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

McMahon, M.  (1994).  The methodology of advanced generalists.  In Advanced generalist practice with an international perspective. (pp. 107-127).  Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

McNellie, B.  (2001).  The advanced rural generalist.  The New Social Worker, 2,  16-17.

Reid, William J.  (1994).  The empirical practice movement. Social Service Review, 68(2), 165-184.

Rosen, A. & Livne, S.  (1992).  Personal versus environmental emphases in social workers' perceptions of client problems.  Social Service Review, 66(1). 85-96.

Smith, D. C. & Hall, J. A.  (2008).  Strengths-oriented family therapy for adolescents with substance abuse problems. Social Work, 53(2), 185-188.

De Jong, P. & Miller, S. D.  (1995).  How to interview for client strengths. Social Work 40(6), 729-736.

Taylor, M. F.  (2006).  Is self-determination still important? what experienced mental health social workers are saying. Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics, 3(1).    (http://www.socialworker.com/jswve/content/view/29/44/)

Younggren, J. N.  (2002).  Ethical decision-making and dual relationships.  (http://kspope.com/dual/younggren.php)        

 

Suggested Texts:

Cialdini, R. B. (2001). Influence, 4th edition. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Pease, A. & Pease, B. P. (2004). The definitive book of body language. New York: Bantam Dell, Random House.



Some of the external readings are included below. See each week's assignment for the specific readings required. Some of these are large files so it may take a bit to download. Either be patient or go to broadband or cable site and save to a disk for use.:
bigler.pdf
cohen.pdf
cox.pdf
deaconpiercy.pdf
dejongmiller.pdf
douglas.pdf
gottlieb.pdf
graziano.pdf
greenetal.pdf
heydtsherman.pdf
johner.pdf
mander.pdf
marsh.pdf
martsetal.pdf
mattisonetal.pdf
mcmahon1.pdf
mcmahon2.pd
mcnellie.pdf
reid.pdf
rosenlivne.pdf
smithhall.pdf
taylor.pdf
younggren.pdf


 

Sample LMSW Exam Questions-webpage , (http://www.mcnellie.com/525/test6.html)

 

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

MSW PROGRAM

 

SWK 525                                                                    Dr. R. Bruce McNellie, LCSW,DCSW

Advanced Generalist Practice                                   mcnellie@mcnellie.com

Fall, 2008                                                                    936 371 2910

 

Assignment 1 (Due: 10/08/2008):  Social Work Practice with Individuals (100 Points)

 

This assignment will examine intervention strategies in advanced social work practice with individuals.  The paper should be about 12-15 pages in length, typewritten, and using APA style of writing.

 

Select from issues that pertain to rural populations:  crime, substance/alcohol abuse, poverty, inadequate housing, inadequate health care or mental health care, scarcity of resources and professional resources, socio-economic underdevelopment and physical distance from services, lack of transportation and school dropout.

 

Students will select a case scenario for an individual with a specific problem within the rural context.  Within that problem area, address the following:

 

1.      Briefly describe the problem area from ecological systems and strengths perspectives, taking into consideration the rural context.

 

2.      Identify and discuss the differential assessment strategies, tools, protocols and techniques, considering aspects of human behavior in the rural environment. Choose from among differential assessments the most appropriate assessment tool(s), and explain your choice.   Additionally, describe and give examples of how these would be used in this situation.

 

3.      Identify the aspects of this situation that require advanced skills.  Choose the specialized intervention(s) most appropriate for the problem, considering the risk factors, cultural implications, and the rural context.  Explain your choice.  What ethical dilemmas might you encounter in the choice of the intervention strategy, and how will handle them?  How might you modify the intervention strategy for adaptation in rural settings?

 

4.      Describe specific methods for evaluating progress toward problem resolution, taking into consideration the rural context.  Include a description of any measurement tools used.  Additionally, describe and give examples of how these would be used in this case.

 

5.      Describe how you would handle termination and follow-up.  What ethical dilemmas might you encounter, and how will you handle these in this rural setting?

 

6.      Describe any foreseeable problems using the preferred intervention strategy with oppressed

populations.                                                            

STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

MSW PROGRAM

 

SWK 525                                                                    Dr. R. Bruce McNellie, LCSW,DCSW

Advanced Generalist Practice                                   mcnellie@mcnellie.com

Fall, 2008                                                                    936 371 2910

 

Assignment 2 (Due: 11/19/2008):  Social Work Practice with Families  (100 points)

 

This assignment will examine intervention strategies in advanced social work practice with families.  The paper should be approximately 10-15 pages in length, typewritten, and in APA style of writing.  Students will select a rural family with a specific problem area to be addressed, and will answer the questions (follow the directions) below.  A minimum of four references is required.  References should support the specialized intervention and practice applications.

 

Select from issues that pertain to rural populations:  crime, substance/alcohol abuse, poverty, inadequate housing, inadequate health care or mental health care, scarcity of resources and professional resources, socio-economic underdevelopment and physical distance from services, lack of transportation and school dropout.

 

1.      Briefly describe the problem area from ecological systems and strengths perspectives, taking into consideration the rural context.

 

  1. Identify and discuss the differential assessment strategies, tools,  protocols and techniques, appropriate for this family, considering aspects of human behavior in the rural environment. Choose from among differential assessments the most appropriate assessment tool(s), and explain your choice.   Additionally, describe and give examples of how these would be used in this situation.

 

  1. Identify the aspects of this situation that require advanced skills.  Choose the specialized intervention(s) most appropriate for the problem, considering the risk factors, cultural implications, and the rural context.  Explain your choice.  What ethical dilemmas might you encounter in the choice of the intervention strategy, and how will handle them?  How might you modify the intervention strategy for adaptation in rural settings?

 

  1. Describe specific methods for evaluating progress toward problem resolution, taking into consideration the rural context.  Include a description of any measurement tools used.  Additionally, describe and give examples of how these would be used in this case.

 

  1. Describe how you would handle termination and follow-up.  What ethical dilemmas might you encounter, and how will you handle these in this rural setting?

 

  1. Describe any foreseeable problems using the preferred intervention strategy with oppressed populations.